Feb
23
Sat
Miner Music Series Presents: The Two Tracks @ Miner Brewing Company
Feb 23 @ 7:30 pm
Miner Music Series Presents: The Two Tracks @ Miner Brewing Company | Texas | United States

Mark your calendars, music fans! A favorite at Miner Brewing Company, The Two Tracks return to Hill City for a Miner Music Series performance on Saturday, Feb. 23, in the Tap Room.

The Two Tracks are based out of Sheridan, Wyo., at the foot of the Bighorn Mountains. The band features Julie Szewc on vocals and acoustic guitar, David Huebner on electric guitar and cello, Fred Serna on drums, and Aaron Ashear on bass. With rock, country, bluegrass, and folk influences, The Two Tracks craft a timeless sound that embodies the sentiment and sensitivity of the American heartland and the rugged journeyman’s spirit of the mountain west.

The band self-released its second album, “Postcard Town,” in May 2017. Recorded at the Butcher Shoppe Studio in Nashville and produced by Will Kimbrough, “Postcard Town” will appeal to both country and rock music fans, with Szewc and Huebner’s just-right vocal harmonies combining to form what Americana journal No Depression described as “a musical banana split of consequence.”

Mar
2
Sat
Black Hills Symphony Orchestra Presents: A Czech Romance @ Performing Arts Center of Rapid City
Mar 2 @ 7:30 pm

First Young Artist Competition winner and Boston Pops cellist, Bill Rounds will perform Antonin Dvorak’s Cello Concerto. The 2019 Winner will also perform with the Black Hills Symphony Orchestra.

Get Tickets by calling 605-394-1786 or online at bhsymphony.org.

Apr
6
Sat
Black Hills Symphony Orchestra Presents: The Red Curtain @ Performing Arts Center of Rapid City
Apr 6 @ 7:30 pm
Black Hills Symphony Orchestra Presents: The Red Curtain @ Performing Arts Center of Rapid City | Rapid City | South Dakota | United States

Shostakovich’s epic 5th Symphony. 1937 Russia—during the height of the Stalinist purges. The Communist Party denounces Dmitri Shostakovich’s most recent works. Fearing for his life, the young composer writes a “Soviet” symphony, ending with a rousing march. But to many, the triumph rang hollow. Was the symphony meant to celebrate Stalin’s regime? Or did it contain hidden messages protesting the very system it seemed to support?

Get Tickets by calling 605-394-1786 or online at bhsymphony.org.