Movement to highlight missing Native women expands to males

In this Jan. 14, 2020, photo, Margaret Bitsue displays a flier that features her son who she reported missing more than two years ago, Tuba City, Ariz. Bitsue hasn't seen or heard from Brandon Sandoval, the youngest of her four children, in more than two years. "I spend most of my days looking down the road expecting him to come up," Bitsue says. The woman's words are soft but capture a room at a Navajo Nation government center, where people are gathered to talk not about women and girls who have disappeared or been killed, but men. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)

TUBA CITY, Ariz. (AP) — A movement to draw attention to Native American women and girls who have been killed or reported missing is expanding in some areas to include males.

Margaret Bitsue’s son is among them. The Navajo woman hasn’t seen or heard from her youngest child in more than four years. She says a recent forum on the Navajo Nation that centered on males gives her hope that she’s not alone in her search for answers.

Late last year, the Trump administration announced it would dedicate more resources to all missing and slain Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

Categories: National News

AlertMe