Rapid City officials look to public to help build budget

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RAPID CITY, S.D. -

Rapid City officials are reaching out to the community for ideas as to how money should be spent in the city’s 2019 budget.

Mayor Steve Allender and Rapid City Budget Analyst Sean Kurbanov introduced a public survey on Monday allowing residents to prioritize which municipal entities should receive funding and how much they should receive. In the survey, residents offer suggestions for splitting $1,000 among education, taxes, and infrastructure.

Allender said the survey is a way to implement priority-based budgeting. City council members will then use the answers to help construct a budget that caters to the city's needs.

“We should have a good plan of what we intend to spend money on and how much, and why we're not spending money on other things,” Allender said on Monday. “We should be able to agree on that as a council. We're all serving the same people.”

Paper surveys are being mailed to 3,000 residents at random. All residents can take it online here.

The deadline for completing the survey is Dec. 22.

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