NEWS PHOTO OF THE DAY

NEWS PHOTO OF THE DAY: APRIL 16-22
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FRIDAY

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(AP Photo/Francois Mori). A police officer takes pictures of petrol bombs and fire extinguishers stockpiled by protesting students inside the Paris Tolbiac university, France, Friday April 20, 2018. French police have evacuated a Paris university site ...
(AP Photo/Francois Mori). A police officer takes pictures of petrol bombs and fire extinguishers stockpiled by protesting students inside the Paris Tolbiac university, France, Friday April 20, 2018.

Police remove students from occupied Paris university site

Posted: Apr 20, 2018 7:13 AM MDT
Updated: Apr 20, 2018 11:15 AM MDT

PARIS (AP) - French police removed students from a Paris university building Friday that had been occupied for a month to protest admission changes that also are causing turmoil at other campuses.

Paris police said the clearing of the Tolbiac Center, a 22-story tower in southern Paris affiliated with Paris 1 University, went "without incident."

Interior minister Gerard Collomb said in a tweet that "the rule of law will be restored everywhere."

(AP Photo/Francois Mori). Police officers walk past walls covered with graffiti and tags by students after police broke up a protest inside the Paris Tolbiac university, France, Friday April 20, 2018. French police have evacuated a Paris university sit...

Students have blocked access or disrupted classes at several other campuses in France to oppose the changes that they fear threaten public university access for all French high school graduates.

Paris 1 University President Georges Haddad said no students were injured during the eviction operation. He told reporters he felt "great relief."

He said police discovered "more than 10 Molotov cocktails" at the center. He estimated the occupation had caused damage worth "hundreds of thousands of euros" and said the site would remain closed until further notice.

The new system of admissions would allow universities to rank applicants based on their own criteria, which could lead to some prospective students being turned down and referred to other programs, if there are not enough places. French high school graduates are guaranteed free university access regardless of their grades.

Lila Le Bas, president of the UNEF students' union, called the evacuation "unacceptable." She criticized the government for refusing to respond to the demands of the occupiers.

(AP Photo/Francois Mori). Walls covered with graffiti by students are pictured after police broke up a protest inside the Paris Tolbiac university, France, Friday April 20, 2018. French police have evacuated a Paris university site occupied for a month...

"It prefers to send police forces to universities," Le Bas said on FranceInfo television.

Government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux said police would intervene "on a case by case basis" to ensure end-of-term examinations can be held.

The university occupations come amid a string of protests and strikes against changes President Emmanuel Macron plans to make in France's rail, hospital and justice systems as part of his economic agenda.

Thousands of people marched across France on Thursday as rail workers resumed their rolling strikes aimed at fighting Macron's plans to revamp the national railway company SNCF and open the train network to competition.

Macron has repeatedly said he won't cave in under pressure, arguing that he was elected last year to reform the country.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


THURSDAY

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(NTSB via AP). National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The Southwes...
(NTSB via AP). National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.

Southwest Airlines sought more time for engine inspections

Posted: Apr 18, 2018 11:02 PM MDT
Updated: Apr 19, 2018 3:37 PM MDT

By DAVID KOENIG and CLAUDIA LAUER
Associated Press

DALLAS (AP) - Southwest Airlines sought more time last year to inspect fan blades like the one that snapped off during one of its flights Tuesday in an engine failure that left a passenger dead.

The airline opposed a recommendation by the engine manufacturer to require ultrasonic inspections of certain fan blades within 12 months, saying it needed more time to conduct the work.

(NTSB via AP). In this Tuesday, April 17, 2018 frame from video, a National Transportation Safety Board investigator examines damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in P...

Southwest made the comments last year after U.S. regulators proposed making the inspections mandatory. The Federal Aviation Administration has not yet required airlines to conduct the inspections but said late Wednesday that it would do so in the next two weeks.

The manufacturer's recommendation for more inspections followed an engine blowup on a 2016 Southwest flight. On Tuesday, an engine on another Southwest jet exploded over Pennsylvania, and debris hit the plane. A woman was sucked partway out of the jet when a window shattered. She died later from her injuries.

The plane, a Boeing 737 bound from New York to Dallas with 149 people aboard, made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

Passenger Andrew Needum, a Texas firefighter, said Thursday that he was helping his family and other passengers with their oxygen masks when he heard a commotion behind him. His wife nodded that it was OK for Needum to leave his family to help the injured woman.

Texas rancher Tim McGinty, of Hillsboro, said Tuesday that he and Needum struggled to pull 43-year-old Jennifer Riordan back into the plane. Needum and retired school nurse Peggy Phillips began administering CPR for about 20 minutes, until the plane landed.

Needum on Thursday declined to detail his rescue efforts out of respect for Riordan's family.

"I feel for her family. I feel for her two kids, her husband, the community that they lived in," an emotional Needum told reporters. "I can't imagine what they're going through."

(NTSB via AP). In this Tuesday, April 17, 2018 photo, a National Transportation Safety Board investigator examines damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia...

Federal investigators are still trying to determine how the window came out of the plane. Riordan, who was in a window seat in Row 14, was wearing a seat belt.

Philadelphia's medical examiner said the banking executive and mother of two from Albuquerque, New Mexico, died from blunt-impact injuries to her head, neck and torso.

Investigators said the blade that broke off mid-flight and triggered the fatal accident was showing signs of metal fatigue - microscopic cracks from repeated use.

The National Transportation Safety Board also blamed metal fatigue for the engine failure on a Southwest plane in Florida in 2016 that was able to land safely.

That incident led manufacturer CFM International, a joint venture of General Electric Co. and France's Safran SA, to recommend in June 2017 that airlines conduct ultrasonic inspections of fan blades on many Boeing 737s.

The FAA proposed making the recommendation mandatory in August but never issued a final decision.

On Wednesday, the FAA said it would issue a directive in the next two weeks to require the ultrasonic inspections of fan blades on some CFM56-7B engines after they reach a certain number of takeoffs and landings. Blades that fail inspection would need to be replaced.

It was not immediately clear how many planes would be affected. Last year, the FAA estimated that an order would cover 220 engines on U.S. airlines. That number could be higher now because more engines have hit the number of flights triggering an inspection.

Southwest announced its own program for similar inspections of its 700-plane fleet over the next month. United Airlines said Wednesday it has begun inspecting some of its planes.

American Airlines has about 300 planes with that type of engine, and Delta has about 185. It will not be clear until the FAA issues its rule how many will need inspections.

(Marty Martinez via AP). In this April 17, 2018 photo provided by Marty Martinez, Martinez, left, appears with other passengers after a jet engine blew out on the Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 plane he was flying in from New York to Dallas, resulting i...

Tuesday's emergency broke a string of eight straight years without a fatal accident involving a U.S. airliner.

"Engine failures like this should not occur," Robert Sumwalt, chairman of the NTSB, said Wednesday.

Sumwalt expressed concern about such a destructive engine failure but said it was too soon to draw any conclusions about the safety of CFM56 engines or the entire fleet of Boeing 737s, the most popular airliner ever built.

It is unknown whether the FAA's original directive would have forced Southwest to quickly inspect the engine that blew up.

Southwest CEO Gary Kelly said the plane was inspected on Sunday and nothing appeared out of order. A spokeswoman said it was a visual inspection.

The NTSB's Sumwalt said, however, that the kind of wear seen where the missing fan blade broke off would not have been visible just by looking at the engine.

___

AP Airlines Writer David Koenig reported from Dallas.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


WEDNESDAY

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek). A keeper using a glove puppet imitating a parent feeds baby critically endangered Javan green magpie at the zoo in Prague, Czech Republic, Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The Javan green magpies are one of the most endangered bird...
(AP Photo/Petr David Josek). A keeper using a glove puppet imitating a parent feeds baby critically endangered Javan green magpie at the zoo in Prague, Czech Republic, Tuesday, April 17, 2018.

Prague zookeepers use puppet to raise endangered magpie

Posted: Apr 17, 2018 7:21 AM MDT
Updated: Apr 18, 2018 11:46 AM MDT

By KAREL JANICEK
Associated Press

PRAGUE (AP) - Zookeepers in Prague have turned into puppeteers in an effort to save the critically endangered Javan green magpie.

Zoo officials saved one precious egg after the parents threw a second egg out of their nest. The magpie chick that hatched a month ago is being kept in a box and is being fed using a puppet that imitates a parent bird.

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek). Baby critically endangered Javan green magpie sits on a branch at its box at the zoo in Prague, Czech Republic, Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The Javan green magpies are one of the most endangered birds species on earth.

Bird keeper Antonin Vaidl said the puppet is needed to make sure the bird will be capable of breeding, which it won't be if it gets used to people.

"It is a critically endangered taxon, every individual is important," Vaidl said. "This way we can eliminate the possibility that the bird would not be able to breed ... it will grow into a healthy individual that is able to reproduce."

Vaidl said the puppet doesn't have to be a perfect imitation of an adult bird because the baby responds to certain signals, such as a red beak, black patches around the eyes and a bright green background.

The rare Javan green magpie and other birds are popular as status-symbol pets in the magpie's native Indonesian island of Java and elsewhere in Asia.

The green magpies are one the most endangered birds on Earth. It's estimated only about 50 of them are living in the wild while another 50 are in captivity in few zoos. In Europe, about 30 of them are in Britain and Prague.

A zoo in the British city of Chester brought six pairs of them from Asia in 2015, giving one pair to Prague and another to a zoo in Jersey as part of a coordinated effort to save the species.

"To save it from extinction ... that's the reason we have been doing this," Vaidl said.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


TUESDAY

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(AP Photo/File). FILE - In this Oct. 11, 1984, file photo, Barbara Bush, wife of then-U.S. Vice-President George Bush, is photographed at the debate between Bush and Democrat Geraldine Ferraro. A family spokesman said Tuesday, April 17, 2018, that form...
(AP Photo/File). FILE - In this Oct. 11, 1984, file photo, Barbara Bush, wife of then-U.S. Vice-President George Bush, is photographed at the debate between Bush and Democrat Geraldine Ferraro.

Presidents, first ladies praise Barbara Bush's dedication

Posted: Apr 18, 2018 12:23 AM MDT
Updated: Apr 18, 2018 10:13 AM MDT

By MICHAEL GRACZYK and TERRY WALLACE
Associated Press

(AP Photo/Doug Mills, File). FILE - In this 1990 file photo, first lady Barbara Bush poses with her dog Millie in Washington. A family spokesman said Tuesday, April 17, 2018, that former first lady Barbara Bush has died at the age of 92.HOUSTON (AP) - Presidents, first ladies and many others who knew Barbara Bush are praising her devotion to the nation, her family and literacy.

President Donald Trump said among Mrs. Bush's greatest achievements "was recognizing the importance of literacy as a fundamental family value that requires nurturing and protection. She will be long remembered for her strong devotion to country and family, both of which she served unfailingly well."

Former President Barack Obama said he and former first lady Michelle Obama will "always be grateful to Mrs. Bush for the generosity she showed to us throughout our time in the White House, but we're even more grateful for the way she lived her life - as a testament to the fact that public service is an important and noble calling; as an example of the humility and decency that reflects the very best of the American spirit."

Mrs. Bush died Tuesday at age 92, family spokesman Jim McGrath said. She had decided to decline further medical treatment for health problems and focus instead on "comfort care" at home in Houston.

( Steve Gonzales/Houston Chronicle via AP, File). FILE - In this March 8, 2017, file photo, the Mensch International Foundation presented its annual Mensch Award to former U.S. President George H.W. Bush and former first lady Barbara Bush at an awards ...A funeral is planned Saturday at St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Houston, which Mrs. Bush and her husband, former President George H.W. Bush, regularly attended. Mrs. Bush will lie in repose Friday at the church for members of the public who want to pay respects. Saturday's service will be by invitation only, according to the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation.

Former President Jimmy Carter and former first lady Rosalynn Carter called Mrs. Bush the "matriarch of a family dedicated to serving, she urged volunteerism as a way for all citizens to participate in our nation's progress."

George H.W. Bush was at his wife's side when she died and had held her hand all day Tuesday, according to Jean Becker, chief of staff at the former president's office in Houston.

Their son, former President George W. Bush, said his family's "souls are settled because we know hers was."

"Barbara Bush was a fabulous First Lady and a woman unlike any other who brought levity, love, and literacy to millions," he said. "To us, she was so much more."

___

Wallace reported from Dallas.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


MONDAY

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(Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP). In this April 13, 2018 photo an archeologist holds an ancient Danish coin which was minted under King Harald Bluetooth after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprdoe on the northern German island of Ruegen in ...
(Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP). In this April 13, 2018 photo an archeologist holds an ancient Danish coin which was minted under King Harald Bluetooth after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprdoe on the northern German island of Ruegen.

Archaeologists find silver treasure on German Baltic island

Posted: Apr 16, 2018 5:18 AM MDT
Updated: Apr 16, 2018 3:36 PM MDT

By KIRSTEN GRIESHABER
Associated Press

BERLIN (AP) - Hundreds of 1,000-year-old silver coins, rings, pearls and bracelets linked to the era of Danish King Harald Gormsson have been found on the eastern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea.

(Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP). The April 13, 2018 photo shows medieval Saxonian, Ottoman, Danish and Byzantine coins after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprode on the northern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea.

A single silver coin was first found in January by two amateur archaeologists, one of them a 13-year-old boy, in a field near the village of Schaprode. The state archaeology office then became involved and the entire treasure was uncovered by experts over the weekend, the Mecklenburg-West Pomerania state archaeology office said Monday.

"It's the biggest trove of such coins in the southeastern Baltic region," the statement said.

The office said the two amateur archeologists were asked to keep quiet about their discovery to give professionals time to plan the dig and were then invited to participate in the recovery.

"This was the (biggest) discovery of my life," hobby archaeologist Rene Schoen told the German news agency dpa.

Schoen said he and 13-year-old Luca Malaschnitschenko were using metal detectors on the field near Schaprode when Luca found a little piece that he initially thought was only aluminum garbage. But when they cleaned it, they understood it was more precious.

Archaeologists said about 100 of the silver coins are probably from the reign of Harald Gormsson, better known as "Harald Bluetooth," who lived in the 10th century and introduced Christianity to Denmark.

(Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP). In this April 13, 2018 photo archaeologists search for coins and jewelry after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprode on the northern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea.

He was one of the last Viking kings of what is now Denmark, northern Germany, southern Sweden and parts of Norway.

His nickname came from the fact he had a dead tooth that looked bluish, but it's now best known for the wireless Bluetooth technology invented by Swedish telecom company Ericsson. The company named the technology, developed to wirelessly unite computers with cellular devices, after him for his ability to unite ancient Scandinavia.

The technology logo carries the runic letters for his initials HB.

___

Jan M. Olsen contributed from Copenhagen, Denmark.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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